Review: Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari

At some point, every one of us embarks on a journey to find love. We meet people, date, get into and out of relationships, all with the hope of finding someone with whom we share a deep connection. This seems standard now, but it’s wildly different from what people did even just decades ago. Single people today have more romantic options than at any point in human history. With technology, our abilities to connect with and sort through these options are staggering. So why are so many people frustrated?

For years, Aziz Ansari has been aiming his comic insight at modern romance, but for Modern Romance, the book, he decided he needed to take things to another level. He teamed up with NYU sociologist Eric Klinenberg and designed a massive research project, including hundreds of interviews and focus groups conducted everywhere from Tokyo to Buenos Aires to Wichita. They analyzed behavioral data and surveys and created their own online research forum on Reddit, which drew thousands of messages. They enlisted the world’s leading social scientists, including Andrew Cherlin, Eli Finkel, Helen Fisher, Sheena Iyengar, Barry Schwartz, Sherry Turkle, and Robb Willer. The result is unlike any social science or humor book we’ve seen before.

In Modern Romance, Ansari combines his irreverent humor with cutting-edge social science to give us an unforgettable tour of our new romantic world. (From Goodreads.)

Personal Take: I love a book that can balance hilarity and interesting facts. Ansari did just that, in his pursuit of what makes men and women look for a romantic partner, and how they go about it. His findings offer a lot to debate about, scoff about or relate to. A lot of it was also either disturbing or intriguing, but one thing is for sure– people in general are just plain weird when it comes to setting the norms of mating. This was a repeated theme across most of the research that was conducted, focus groups (that one was just hilarious), and interviews. I liked Ansari’s honesty and his understanding of what he found, his comedic voice offering some relief in the mess that is the human quest for romance.

Though the book doesn’t get to answer anything, this is still a great read, both hilarious and insightful all in one.

Audience: Adults. For relatable and the weird stories.

Rating:

Other recommendations: This is the only printed book from Aziz Ansari, and the rest are in audio format.