Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

 

After enjoying quite a bit of publishing success, Juliet Ashton can’t think of what her next work should be about. Out of the blue, she receives a letter from a resident of Guernsey, Dawson Adams, who’s acquired a book of hers by chance. Through their correspondence, Juliet discovers that he belongs to a unique society on the small island– the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. Intrigued, Juliet carries on a wider correspondence with the residence of Guernsey, allowing her to discover slivers of their lives during the Nazi occupation.

Personal Take: I can’t say enough how much I enjoyed reading this book. Written in epistolary form, the characters came alive in their correspondence to each other. The description of the time after the war, the people’s lives, Juliet and her life– they all came alive for me. At first, I thought there were too many characters, but soon, it became easy to see how each stood out in their own way, each with their own stories to tell. Juliet herself was a lovable character, a young woman with a lofty sense of humor, who knows her mind, and who loves a good mystery. But really, what blew me away is the level of research that went into this, especially accounts during the war, and even after it. In such delicate details, both Shaffer and Barrows paint a horrific smear in humanity’s history, one that can’t ever be forgotten, but also how the survivors recovered from such a horror.

Easily, this book has become one of my favorites of all time.

Audience: Older teens, adults, especially those who enjoy periodic dramas like Downton Abbey.

Rating:

Other recommendations: For Mary Shaffer, this was the first and only novel to be published. For her niece Annie Barrows, she’s published a few children books.

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